Persistent drought threatens millions with hunger in Haiti - U.N.

by Anastasia Moloney | @anastasiabogota | Thomson Reuters Foundation
Wednesday, 10 February 2016 15:30 GMT

In this file 2004 photo, some of the hundreds of children in Mapou, Haiti, wait all day in the hot sun for workers from the UN's World Food Program (WFP) to distribute special fortified biscuits, REUTERS/Stringer

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Water shortages caused by prolonged drought, made worse by El Nino, have cut food supplies and hit subsistence farmers hard

By Anastasia Moloney

BOGOTA, Feb 10 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Around 3.6 million people in Haiti are struggling to feed themselves as three consecutive years of drought have ruined harvests and raised food prices, worsening hunger among the poor, the U.N. World Food Programme (WFP) has said.

The poorest country in the Americas, Haiti cannot produce enough food for its 10.4 million people in normal times, and hundreds of thousands of Haitians rely on international food aid to survive.

Acute water shortages caused by prolonged drought, made worse by the El Nino weather phenomenon, have cut food supplies and hit subsistence farmers hard. Three out of four Haitians live on less than $2 a day.

"Without rain for the 2016 spring season, farmers will lose their fourth consecutive harvest on which they normally depend to feed their families," Wendy Bigham, WFP's deputy country director in Haiti, said in a statement late on Tuesday.

The main 2015 harvest fell below average, with losses of up to 70 percent in some places, the WFP said. "In some areas of Haiti, up to 70 percent of the population is facing hunger."

A recent study by the Haitian government and the U.N. Children's agency (UNICEF) found that "malnutrition rates are above emergency levels in several communes," the WFP said.

The food crisis comes at a time of political uncertainty and social unrest after Michel Martelly stepped down as president last week without an elected successor, leaving a deeply divided country in the hands of a disputed interim government.

Nearly 500,000 schoolchildren across Haiti rely on school meals provided by the WFP for their daily meal, and school meals make up the largest food safety net in the country.

The WFP has distributed food aid, including rice, sugar, oil and salt, to 120,000 people in drought-hit areas since November.

It says it will expand its programe by providing food and cash to one million Haitians facing hunger to help them cope with rising food prices.

The agency provides 200,000 Haitians with cash in exchange for work on watershed management and soil conservation projects to improve agriculture.

The drought has gripped other parts of the Caribbean and Central America, particularly parts of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.

The current El Nino, which began in early 2015, is one of the strongest on record and has also caused widespread crop losses in countries ranging from Ethiopia to Papua New Guinea.

(Reporting by Anastasia Moloney, editing by Tim Pearce. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org)

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