Rohingya screen light portraits

Source: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 12:00 PM
Author: REUTERS/Minzayar
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In a camp for displaced Rohingya Muslims residents frequent bamboo “internet huts” where they can communicate with relatives who left the country, escaping the violence that led to 200 deaths and left over 140,000 homeless in 2012. Some arrive safely, while others are held hostage for ransom by human traffickers at jungle camps in Thailand or Malaysia. Each relative tells their own story of a family member they are still trying to keep in touch with and how they came to be separated.

  • A man speaks at a computer in an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

  • Norbanu, a 60-year-old Rohingya, speaks with her daughter's boyfriend, who is now in Indonesia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 14, 2015. He has broken his promise to send for her, Norbanu tells him, so she will now marry off her daughter to another man. REUTERS/Minzayar

  • A boy peers into an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

  • Sohidar, 25, a Rohingya mother of four, enjoys an internet reunion with her husband Muhammad Shamin, 30, who works in Malaysia, from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar January 31, 2015. Her face is smeared with a traditional Burmese cosmetic paste called thanaka. "Whatever happens, whatever anyone does, don't get into any fights", Sohidar warns him. "Don't worry, don't worry," he replies. REUTERS/Minzayar

  • Abdul Salam, a 47-year-old Rohingya, asks a friend in Malaysia for advice from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar January 29, 2015. His friend Muhammad Rafiq, a Rohingya in Thae Chaung village, has a son held by traffickers, and they are raising the money to pay the ransom. Abdul Salam's question is: How can he be sure the trafficker, once paid, will let the boy go? REUTERS/Minzayar

  • People gather in and around an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar February 15, 2015. REUTERS/Minzayar

  • Rahana cries as she talks with traffickers from an internet hut in Thae Chaung village, home to thousands of displaced Rohingya Muslims near Sittwe, the capital of Rakhine State in western Myanmar January 29, 2015. Rahana, a 32-year-old Rohingya, has already sent $1,100 to the trafficker who is holding her 12-year-old son ransom at a camp along the Thailand-Malaysia border. The trafficker wants another $300 before he will release the boy. "Let me speak to my son", Rahana tells the trafficker. A few seconds pass, then a small voice says, "Mum"? Rahana's eyes fill with tears. "I will send the money", she assures her son. "Then they will let you go". REUTERS/Minzayar

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