FACTBOX-Price hikes shore up revenue for top-selling U.S. drugs

by Reuters
Monday, 4 April 2016 10:00 GMT

By Caroline Humer

NEW YORK, April 4 (Reuters) - Hefty price increases bolstered revenues for manufacturers even as prescriptions declined over the past five years. Below is a breakdown for the top 10 drugs by U.S. sales, based on the most recently available data from IMS Health and interviews with price experts.

List price increases were calculated using data from Truven Health Analytics and do not reflect rebates and discounts negotiated with insurers. U.S. revenue was based on company reports.

AbbVie Inc increased the price of Humira, an injectible drug, by 126 percent for a typical monthly treatment to $3,797.10, compared with $1,676.98 on Dec. 31, 2010. The drug had $8.4 billion in U.S. sales in 2015 versus $6.5 billion in 2014.

Amgen raised the list price of Enbrel by 118 percent to $932.16 for a typical weekly treatment from $427.24 on Dec. 31, 2010, including three increases last year. It had U.S. sales of $5.1 billion in 2015, up from $4.4 billion a year earlier.

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd raised the price of multiple sclerosis drug Copaxone by 118 percent, pushing its monthly price to $6,593.00 from $3,025.04 on Dec. 31, 2010. It had U.S. sales of $4.0 billion in 2015 versus $4.2 billion in 2014.

AstraZeneca Plc increased the price of cholesterol fighter Crestor's three-month supply by 113 percent to $745.41 from $350.17. Sales fell about 3 percent to $2.84 billion in 2015.

Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co Ltd raised the list price by 96 percent for a typical monthly supply of depression drug Abilify to $891.97, up from $454.07 on Dec. 31, 2010. U.S. sales were not available.

Sanofi SA raised the list price of Lantus Solostar, an insulin glargine product used to treat diabetes by 94 percent for 5 pen devices to $372.76, up from $191.96 on Dec. 31, 2010. Its list price has not changed since the end of 2014. Total U.S. sales of Lantus, which includes other delivery mechanisms in addition to Solostar, fell 20 percent to 4 billion euros ($4.55 billion) in 2015 from a year earlier.

GlaxoSmithKline Plc's asthma treatment Advair Diskus inhalation disks for a 30-day supply rose to $334.63, up 67 percent from $199.90 on Dec. 31, 2010. Advair, which includes other delivery mechanisms in addition to disks, had 2015 U.S. sales of $2.85 billion, a decline of 13 percent.

Johnson & Johnson's arthritis treatment Remicade, which is administered as an infusion typically every 4 to 8 weeks, increased 63 percent to $1,071.48 from $657.87 on Dec. 31, 2010 per treatment. Remicade U.S. sales rose 7 percent to $4.45 billion in 2015.

Amgen Inc's Neulasta, an injectible drug used to prevent infection in chemotherapy patients, rose 55 percent to $5,155.65 per treatment from $3,320 on Dec. 31, 2010. Its 2015 U.S. sales were $3.89 billion versus $3.65 billion.

AstraZeneca Plc's Nexium treatment for acid reflux sold as a monthly supply rose 54 percent to $250.94 from $162.55 on Dec. 31, 2010. Nexium had U.S. sales of $2.5 billion in 2015, down 32 percent from a year earlier. ($1 = 0.8788 euros) (Reporting by Caroline Humer; Editing by Michele Gershberg and Lisa Girion)

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